Search

B Noir Detour

Month

September 2015

#BNoirDetour Film for 9/27: Pickup on South Street

Ok, so it's a cold war commie spy film with a thin plot, a low budget, and an implausible love story. But against that, I give you a thief for a main character whose non-patriotic persona pissed off J. Edgar... Continue Reading →

Shack Out on 101: See You in the Fall Blogathon

It's still 80 degrees in the shade where I live, but that won't stop today from beginning MovieMovieBlogBlog's See You in the Fall Blogathon. Our goal? To write a blog entry about a media moment related to physical comedy. With such a prompt,... Continue Reading →

Film for 9/20: Behind Locked Doors

What do you get when you combine the actor who'll play the (human) lead in Creature from the Black Lagoon, the actress who played eldest sister Rose in Meet Me in St. Louis, and uncredited but fabulously B performances as mental institution patients by Tor... Continue Reading →

Lauren Bacall in The Big Sleep: The Lauren Bacall Blogathon

This post is written for the Lauren Bacall Blogathon, hosted by In the Good Old Days of Classic Hollywood. Lauren Bacall in The Big Sleep: A Love Letter Unlike many of my film-loving friends, when it comes to classic Hollywood,... Continue Reading →

STREAMING SATURDAYS! Lupino & Fontaine Fall for THE BIGAMIST

Wonderful write-up of The Bigamist.

Sister Celluloid

A hundred years ago this week, a miracle happened!!

On September 10, 1915, Edmond O’Brien was born…

In 1953’s The Bigamist, he scrambles up and down the California coast, shuttling between two wives. If I’d been anywhere in the vicinity, it would have been three.

sis-thebigamist-6

Ida Lupino, who also directed, plays Phyllis, an L.A. restaurant hostess and the more sympathetic of the two wives. And that was my main gripe: not that she took the plummier role (why wouldn’t she?), but that her rival (Joan Fontaine) was subtly frowned upon for being a—gasp!—business woman, and a damned good one. So, of course her husband became a bigamist! He was lonely and emasculated and blah, blah, blah… Really, Ida? You, of all people, ran with that tired old trope?

Here’s the thing, though: in other ways, the movie is pretty subversive, especially for a noir. O’Brien, unlikely as it may seem…

View original post 330 more words

I Love Brit Noir: Postmark for Danger

My enjoyment of film noir began with American film in the 1940s. My favorite noir still mostly centers there. But the more I watch 1940s and 50s British noir -- or noirish British dramas and thrillers -- the more I... Continue Reading →

Guest-hosting a #BNoirDetour Live Tweet double feature on Sun., Sept. 13

MovieMovieBlogBlog is doing a double feature for this week’s BNoirDetour!

BigOne

Holy maloney, when did I die and go to film-noir heaven? I’m as giddy as Richard Widmark pushing a wheelchair-bound woman down the stairs!

For this Sunday, the film-noir blog BNoirDetour is letting me completely handle her usual Sunday Twitter.com presentation of noir movies. She kindly let me co-host about a month ago, but this is the first time she’s given me the whole she-bang to handle. Don’t worry, though, I’m giving you a couple of memorable flicks to finish off your weekend!

aaawatch35

My first choice is a particularly earthy number from 1955 titled Murder Is My Beat. It stars Paul Langton as Ray Patrick, a police detective who is aboard a train to accompany Eden Lane (Barbara Payton), a convicted murderess, to prison to carry out her sentence. But during a brief layover, Eden happens to look out the window — and wouldn’t you know it, she sees…

View original post 298 more words

Barbara Stanwyck and Lady of Burlesque: William Wellman Blogathon

William Wellman is not a director I know well, and he didn't direct film noir, so I had to work hard to find a way to take on the challenge of Now Voyaging's William Wellman Blogathon. Of course, I've seen... Continue Reading →

Lawrence Tierney: The Hoodlum vs Born to Kill

Born to Kill (1947, Robert Wise) is one of my favorite noir films. It's a relentless, murderous tale, and Lawrence Tierney is a large part of its power (though Claire Trevor matches his performance blow for blow). Recently, I learned... Continue Reading →

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑